1. I was born in New Iberia, La., on July 27, 1898.
  2. Both of my parents died before I reached the fourth grade. I went to live with my grandmother, a former slave. I only ever received an elementary school education.
  3. My activism isn’t very well documented. My ideas were mainly spread orally, and as a working-class Black woman, I was not the subject of much study or documentation, leaving few written records of my achievements.
  4. I became very immersed in the civil rights movement and allied with prominent leaders such as Marcus Garvey, Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, Rosa Parks and Jesse Jackson.
  5. In 1957, I presented a petition to the United Nations, and a second in 1959, arguing for reparations of $200 billion to Black Americans to monetarily compensate for 400 years of slavery.
  6. I founded the Universal Association of Ethiopian Women (UAEW) in the 1960s. This group led poor and working-class Black women in petitioning the state to reinstate their welfare benefits as a form of reparations.
  7. Taking the first of many trips to Africa in 1972, I was given the title “Queen Mother” by members of the Ashanti people in Ghana.
  8. My activism lasted for 70 years, and I dedicated the majority of my career to fighting for reparations. I argued that to promote reparations was to adopt a political stance that claimed that the Middle Passage, slavery and Jim Crow systematically destroyed the culture, heritage and rights of Africans and their descendants, and that these atrocities could only be remedied through extensive economic restitution distributed by way of grassroots networks.
  9. I argued that Black Americans were entitled to 13.1% of all jobs as well as “preferential treatment and hiring on a job quota basis” to “further serve to balance [their] mal-treatment.” These were some of my efforts to establish a legal and judicial justification for repayment and indicate how reparations activism could foster differently constituted futures for people of African descent in the United States.
  10. On May 2, 1997, I peacefully passed away at age 98.
  1. I was born in New Iberia, La., on July 27, 1898.
  2. Both of my parents died before I reached the fourth grade. I went to live with my grandmother, a former slave. I only ever received an elementary school education.
  3. My activism isn’t very well documented. My ideas were mainly spread orally, and as a working-class Black woman, I was not the subject of much study or documentation, leaving few written records of my achievements.
  4. I became very immersed in the civil rights movement and allied with prominent leaders such as Marcus Garvey, Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, Rosa Parks and Jesse Jackson.
  5. In 1957, I presented a petition to the United Nations, and a second in 1959, arguing for reparations of $200 billion to Black Americans to monetarily compensate for 400 years of slavery.
  6. I founded the Universal Association of Ethiopian Women (UAEW) in the 1960s. This group led poor and working-class Black women in petitioning the state to reinstate their welfare benefits as a form of reparations.
  7. Taking the first of many trips to Africa in 1972, I was given the title “Queen Mother” by members of the Ashanti people in Ghana.
  8. My activism lasted for 70 years, and I dedicated the majority of my career to fighting for reparations. I argued that to promote reparations was to adopt a political stance that claimed that the Middle Passage, slavery and Jim Crow systematically destroyed the culture, heritage and rights of Africans and their descendants, and that these atrocities could only be remedied through extensive economic restitution distributed by way of grassroots networks.
  9. I argued that Black Americans were entitled to 13.1% of all jobs as well as “preferential treatment and hiring on a job quota basis” to “further serve to balance [their] mal-treatment.” These were some of my efforts to establish a legal and judicial justification for repayment and indicate how reparations activism could foster differently constituted futures for people of African descent in the United States.
  10. On May 2, 1997, I peacefully passed away at age 98.

Answer: Queen Mother Audley Moore