By MIREYNNA VILLAR, age 8

The Titicaca water frog (<em>Telmatobius coleus</em>) is a species that’s in extreme danger of extinction. PHOTO: Joshua Stone/Wikimedia Commons
The Titicaca water frog (Telmatobius coleus) is a species that’s in extreme danger of extinction. PHOTO: Joshua Stone/Wikimedia Commons

The Titicaca water frog (Telmatobius coleus) is a species that’s in extreme danger of extinction. It is an amphibian that is endemic to Lake Titicaca, which is located between Peru and Bolivia. It is the largest lake in South America, situated at a very high altitude, around 3800 meters above sea level. This frog has a broad, flattened head with a round snout and large eyes. Coloration varies a lot between frogs. The back can be olive green, dark green or black, with the underside varying between pearl and white. It has a loose skin, which some people say gives it an ugly appearance. The Titicaca water frog eats snails, insects, tadpoles and fish.

Did You Know?

  • The Titicaca water frog is the world’s largest aquatic frog, weighing up to one kilogram (a little over two pounds).
  • The frog’s trap air in their multiple folds in the skin, enabling it to breathe underwater without needing to go to the surface for air.
  • The Titicaca water frog is threatened by overcollection by humans who use it for food and medicine.

Endemic: A species that is found in a specific area of the world