By Amanda Vender

Big Supermarkets: Some neighborhoods have grocery stores with aisles of colorful sweet-smelling fresh fruits and vegetables at affordable prices. Photo: Amanda Vender
Big Supermarkets: Some neighborhoods have grocery stores with aisles of colorful sweet-smelling fresh fruits and vegetables at affordable prices. Photo: Amanda Vender

Convenience Stores: Unfortunately, more and more of us are living in food deserts. We can walk and walk all over the neighborhood in search of fresh vegetables or fruit, and all we find are fast food restaurants and convenience stores. These stores sell foods in sealed boxes, bags, cans or bottles that can sit on shelves or in freezers for months - or even years. Photo: Amanda Vender
Convenience Stores: Unfortunately, more and more of us are living in food deserts. We can walk and walk all over the neighborhood in search of fresh vegetables or fruit, and all we find are fast food restaurants and convenience stores. These stores sell foods in sealed boxes, bags, cans or bottles that can sit on shelves or in freezers for months – or even years. Photo: Amanda Vender

Community Garden: When there are limited options for fresh food, some residents take matters into their own hands. In city neighborhoods like this one in Brooklyn, NY, residents have started community gardens where they grow their own vegetables. Photo: Flatbush Gardener
Community Garden: When there are limited options for fresh food, some residents take matters into their own hands. In city neighborhoods like this one in Brooklyn, NY, residents have started community gardens where they grow their own vegetables. Photo: Flatbush Gardener

Green Markets: Some city neighborhoods, like this one in Chicago, have green markets wehre farmers come each week to sell their harvests. Residents get fresh food that didn't have to travel far to get to them. Photo: Swanksalot
Green Markets: Some city neighborhoods, like this one in Chicago, have green markets wehre farmers come each week to sell their harvests. Residents get fresh food that didn’t have to travel far to get to them. Photo: Swanksalot

Home Gardens: In March First Lady Michelle Obama started an organic garden on White House property to promote eating fresh vegetables. Organic means that there are no chemical pesticides or fertilizers used. Not everyone was happy with the news. The Mid America Crop Life Association that represents the companies that make pesticides is concerned that Obama isn't using chemicals on her garden, fearing that the organic garden will give crop chemicals a bad reputation. Photo: The White House
Home Gardens: In March First Lady Michelle Obama started an organic garden on White House property to promote eating fresh vegetables. Organic means that there are no chemical pesticides or fertilizers used. Not everyone was happy with the news. The Mid America Crop Life Association that represents the companies that make pesticides is concerned that Obama isn’t using chemicals on her garden, fearing that the organic garden will give crop chemicals a bad reputation. Photo: The White House