By NINI KAUFFMAN-O’HEHIR, age 9
Mentored by ANNIE FOX

Aerial view of Tongass National Forest. The effects of logging in this forest will impact an ecosystem of animals as well as humans. PHOTO: Alan Wu/Flickr
Aerial view of Tongass National Forest. The effects of logging in this forest will impact an ecosystem of animals as well as humans. PHOTO: Alan Wu/Flickr

The Alexander Archipelago Wolf is becoming endangered because of logging in the Tongass National Forest in southeastern Alaska. It appears that the habitat of its main prey, Sitka black-tailed deer, is being destroyed. The rare wolf may get Endangered Species Act (ESA) Protection. ESA protection would mean the wolves are protected from things that are harmful to them.

Some wildlife scientists want the wolves to be protected by the ESA. Rebecca Noblin from the Center for Biological Diversity said, “The Alexander Archipelago Wolf, one of Alaska’s most fascinating species, needs the protection of the ESA if it is to have any chance of survival.”

The Alexander Archipelago Wolf may get Endangered Species Act (ESA) Protection. ESA protection would mean the wolves are protected from things that are harmful to them. PHOTO: United States Forest Service
The Alexander Archipelago Wolf may get Endangered Species Act (ESA) Protection. ESA protection would mean the wolves are protected from things that are harmful to them. PHOTO: United States Forest Service

There are also some people who believe loggers should be able to keep their jobs. The Alaska Forest Association, a group of people in the timber business who want to protect the industry, doesn’t believe there are any endangered animals in the Tongass forest. Their belief is that logging is harmless and perhaps even helpful to the forest.

The effects of logging in the Tongass National Forest will impact an ecosystem of animals as well as humans. David K. Person, a wildlife scientist and expert on wolves and deer says, “That community includes deer, wolves, black bears and people.”