By NANCY RYERSON

Childhood obesity rates dropped for the first time in several U.S. cities, according to December 2012 numbers. The trend was found largely in cities like New York and Philadelphia that have anti-childhood obesity tactics in place, such as removing sugary drinks and deep fryers from school cafeterias. In the U.S., around 17 percent of children under 20 are obese. People who are obese as kids are more likely to be obese as adults and develop diseases such as diabetes. Experts hope numbers will stick and will continue to fall especially among lower income children, who are more likely to be obese than wealthier children.

Some schools have removed unhealthy snacks and sugary drinks to help reduce childhood obesity.
Some schools have removed unhealthy snacks and sugary drinks from being sold to help reduce childhood obesity.