Trump Comes to Power: Protesters Chant “Not My President”

Dec 2nd, 2016 • Category: Lead Story, Nation & World

By MARIANNE N. NACANAYNAY, age 13

Hundreds of students at high schools in Des Moines, IA staged a walkout on Wednesday, November 9 to voice their concerns about the 2016 election outcome and express their support for each other. PHOTO by Phil Roeder
Hundreds of students at high schools in Des Moines, IA staged a walkout on Wednesday, November 9 to voice their concerns about the 2016 election outcome and express their support for each other. Photo by Phil Roeder

On November 8, 2016, the United States elected Donald Trump as its next president. He will become the first president who hasn’t served in elected office since Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952.

Trump’s victory is already being protested across the country. Trump made a large number of racist, xenophobic and sexist statements during his campaign. Multiple individuals brought up rape charges against him, and in October, audio from a recording in 2005 showed Trump making lewd comments about women that suggested sexual harassment and rape.

Last April, Trump attacked Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, saying, “The only thing [Clinton’s] got going is the woman card.” Surprisingly, though, the majority of white women voted for Trump in the election.

Trump’s plans for his first 100 days in office include allowing the Keystone Pipeline construction to move forward and canceling “every unconstitutional executive action, memorandum and order” President Obama has delivered.

If Trump reversed all of Obama’s executive actions, he would also get rid of an immigration program called DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Immigrant youth who fall under the program are better known as Dreamers, and there are an estimated 700,000 of them at risk of being deported.

But Trump’s anti-immigration stance is another reason why he ended up with 290 out of 538 electoral college votes. During his campaign, Trump talked about building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico (and having Mexico pay for it), banning Muslims from entering the country and deporting more than 11 million undocumented immigrants.

According to an August Pew Research Center poll, 79 percent of Trump’s supporters think the southern border wall should be built. In an interview with NPR, Texas Republican representative Maria Guadalupe Dempsey said, “You build a fence, you put a gate up and you open and close it as you wish. You invite people in. You don’t want people who are not invited to come into the country.”

In the days immediately following the election, journalists and activists have reported incidents of racist and anti-Muslim harassment. For example, one Afghan woman in Nashville said the neighbor she had grown up with her entire life told her to “go back to where I came from and get the hell out of HER country.”

Muslim kids protesting Donald Trump in December 2015 in New York City hold up signs to combat Islamophobia. One of Trump’s plans for his first 100 days in office is to ban immigration from many Muslim-majority countries associated with terrorism. PHOTO by Joe Catron
Muslim kids protesting Donald Trump in December 2015 in New York City hold up signs to combat Islamophobia. One of Trump’s plans for his first 100 days in office is to ban immigration from many Muslim-majority countries associated with terrorism. Photo by Joe Catron

Beginning the day after Election Day, protests against Trump’s victory sprung up across the country. Across Los Angeles county, an estimated 4,000 high school students, too young to vote, walked out of school on November 10 in protest; plans for a country-wide student walkout on November 14 are being spread on social media.

“We feel unsafe with our futures,” said student Dana Douthwight of West Seattle High School, another school that had an estimated 200 students leave class.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is also protesting by taking steps toward preparing for court against Trump. In a blog post published the day after the election, the ACLU asked Trump to change his positions on his campaign promises. Calling the proposals “unlawful” and “unconstitutional”, the organization addressed the president-elect directly and said, “If you do not reverse course and instead endeavor to make these campaign promises a reality, you will have to contend with the full firepower of the ACLU at every step.”

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